The LCROSS brew

The LCROSS probe has been featured on this blog before, but now the new goodies have been released, in form of five papers in the Science journal of Oct. 22.

We now know the content of volatiles (and other elements) in the soil at the LCROSS impact site. My visualizations below.

(click the image to get a fullsize view, or  here for an interactive visualization)

(click the image to get a fullsize view, or  here for an interactive visualization)

(click the image to get a fullsize view, or  here for an interactive visualization)

Key to symbols:

  • LTV – Low Temperature Volatiles (<600K)
  • HTV – High Temperature Volatiles
  • CON – early condensate
  • MET – metal
  • SIL – Silicate

Compiled from:

  • Colaprete et.al., “Detection of water in the LCROSS ejecta plume”, Science 330 (2010)
  • Gladstone et.al., “LRO-LAMP Observations of the LCROSS impact plume”, Science 330 (2010)

Notes:

  1. Gladstone et. al. give H2 content of 1.4% as measured by LRO. This omitted from the dataset, as this hydrogen is most likely already included in the organic compounds detected by LCROSS (as noted by Colaprete et.al.).
  2. Colaprete et. al. give the H2O content as 5.6+/-2.9% and give the content of other organics as percentage of water mass. To get absolute ppm, I have used the 5.6% figure.
  3. For some molecules, the given value is the upper limit.
  4. Note the difference between Co (cobalt) and CO (carbon monoxide).
  5. The published numbers add up to 34.73% of soil content. The remainder is unaccounted for and has been omitted from the visualizations for clarity.
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One Response to “The LCROSS brew”

  1. […] wait a moment. We also know that the permanently shadowed regions harbor water and other interesting volatiles. Wouldn’t it be better to set up a base there? Not really, because at ca. -200°C the […]

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